playwrightswest:

What are you working on right now, Patrick?

Right now, I’m revisiting a play that I put aside when I got the Sloan commission to write Continuum. The play is caled, The Chain and The Gear. It’s about what effect the hit-and-run death of a cyclist has on certain people in her Southeast Portland neighborhood. I had already been somewhat interested in city cyclists and how they interact with drivers within urban boundaries, when a friend of mine was killed on her bicycle by a driver back in 2006. My musings about how a small community of people who might not even know each other might react and interact in the wake of her death turned into the beginnings of this play, which is structured in a series of scenes that impinge on each other. I am excited to be getting back to it, and hope to have it ready by the time of Portland’s 2014 Fertile Ground festival.

playwrightswest:

What are you working on right now, Patrick?

Right now, I’m revisiting a play that I put aside when I got the Sloan commission to write Continuum. The play is caled, The Chain and The Gear. It’s about what effect the hit-and-run death of a cyclist has on certain people in her Southeast Portland neighborhood. I had already been somewhat interested in city cyclists and how they interact with drivers within urban boundaries, when a friend of mine was killed on her bicycle by a driver back in 2006. My musings about how a small community of people who might not even know each other might react and interact in the wake of her death turned into the beginnings of this play, which is structured in a series of scenes that impinge on each other. I am excited to be getting back to it, and hope to have it ready by the time of Portland’s 2014 Fertile Ground festival.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

Patrick: Do You Listen To Music When You Write?

Bob Dylan is an artist that I constantly listen to when I write. I’m not quite sure why that is, and in fact it’s a little odd to me that I would want to listen to only Bob Dylan and not some other artists as well. I especially like his earlier, folk period, I think because it’s simple and repetitive, but also distinct. It’s comforting. His voice is unmistakeable, and it ranges everywhere. Maybe it inspires me to range everywhere too. Or maybe it just gets me out of my usual ways of thinking and into a groove where I can explore. Who knows? I know I like it, though.

playwrightswest:

Patrick: Do You Listen To Music When You Write?

Bob Dylan is an artist that I constantly listen to when I write. I’m not quite sure why that is, and in fact it’s a little odd to me that I would want to listen to only Bob Dylan and not some other artists as well. I especially like his earlier, folk period, I think because it’s simple and repetitive, but also distinct. It’s comforting. His voice is unmistakeable, and it ranges everywhere. Maybe it inspires me to range everywhere too. Or maybe it just gets me out of my usual ways of thinking and into a groove where I can explore. Who knows? I know I like it, though.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

Where I Work: Patrick Wohlmut

As you can see, I like a messy desk. I organize things I want to work on in a pile, in which I know the order of things (approximately). In the lower drawer, underneath the sets of headphones and cords and phone chargers, are a series of files in which I keep newspaper and magazine clippings, photographs, song lyrics, blog posts, basically anything informational that might act as inspiration for a play or a scene. There are numerous books on the shelf covering a wide range of topics, including Harry Potter on the desk (yes, it’s mine, don’t judge). The workspace is a little cramped, but I expect that to change when I move to a bigger house later this month.

playwrightswest:

Where I Work: Patrick Wohlmut

As you can see, I like a messy desk. I organize things I want to work on in a pile, in which I know the order of things (approximately). In the lower drawer, underneath the sets of headphones and cords and phone chargers, are a series of files in which I keep newspaper and magazine clippings, photographs, song lyrics, blog posts, basically anything informational that might act as inspiration for a play or a scene. There are numerous books on the shelf covering a wide range of topics, including Harry Potter on the desk (yes, it’s mine, don’t judge). The workspace is a little cramped, but I expect that to change when I move to a bigger house later this month.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

10 Questions With Patrick Wohlmut

1. A Playwright I Have a Giant Artist Crush On Is …
Suzan-Lori Parks. I love the way that she choreographs voices, characters, actions, settings, everything really, into a larger whole. Her work has a completeness, a unity that I want to strive for when I write.

2.  A Play That Has Shaped My Artistic Voice Is …
All In The Timing, by David Ives. It’s really a collection of short plays, but each one is interesting, structurally unique, toys with the idea of what it means to be a PLAY, and uses humor to underscore an existential or philosophical crisis. When I write a play I try to connect equally with an audience’s minds and with their hearts, and I think Ives exemplifies one way this can be done.

3. When I’m Not Writing You Can Often Find Me …
Being a dad, working in a library (I work in two, actually, as a reference librarian), doing social media for Playwrights West, recording a radio show for the WSU Vancouver Library or contributing to the podcast Let’s All Really Geek Out, reading, and watching sci-fi/fantasy TV and movies.

4. My Artistic Voice Can Be Described as ______________ Meets ______________
Counterpoint meets Chiaroscuro. Either that, or Snark meets Snuggle.

5. A Portland Artist or Company I’d Love To Work With Is … 
I’d love to write something for the Vertigo ensemble, or for Defunkt. Both companies have a fearlessness about tackling new or risky work, and I think writing for them would push me to make something really challenging and exciting.

6. I Am Terrified Of …
Snakes. I used to have a recurring nightmare about a Burmese python sneaking into my son’s room and eating him while he slept. Yeah… I hate snakes.

7. I Am Obsessed With … 
Beer. I recently started to make my own beer, and now making, drinking, and learning about beer had become a full-fledged hobby. So I guess add that to #3.

8. The Book Currently On My Nightstand Is … 
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. I went for a long time without reading the last three books in the series. I am now correcting that error.

9. Three Adjectives That Describe My Current Work Are … 
Small-Scale. Connective. PushMe/PullYou. 

10. In the Indie Art-House Bio Film Of My Life, I Should Be Played By … 
Jim Broadbent. Forget the leading men; character actors are the ones with real depth, versatility and power.

playwrightswest:

10 Questions With Patrick Wohlmut

1. A Playwright I Have a Giant Artist Crush On Is …
Suzan-Lori Parks. I love the way that she choreographs voices, characters, actions, settings, everything really, into a larger whole. Her work has a completeness, a unity that I want to strive for when I write.

2. A Play That Has Shaped My Artistic Voice Is …
All In The Timing, by David Ives. It’s really a collection of short plays, but each one is interesting, structurally unique, toys with the idea of what it means to be a PLAY, and uses humor to underscore an existential or philosophical crisis. When I write a play I try to connect equally with an audience’s minds and with their hearts, and I think Ives exemplifies one way this can be done.

3. When I’m Not Writing You Can Often Find Me …
Being a dad, working in a library (I work in two, actually, as a reference librarian), doing social media for Playwrights West, recording a radio show for the WSU Vancouver Library or contributing to the podcast Let’s All Really Geek Out, reading, and watching sci-fi/fantasy TV and movies.

4. My Artistic Voice Can Be Described as ______________ Meets ______________
Counterpoint meets Chiaroscuro. Either that, or Snark meets Snuggle.

5. A Portland Artist or Company I’d Love To Work With Is …
I’d love to write something for the Vertigo ensemble, or for Defunkt. Both companies have a fearlessness about tackling new or risky work, and I think writing for them would push me to make something really challenging and exciting.

6. I Am Terrified Of …
Snakes. I used to have a recurring nightmare about a Burmese python sneaking into my son’s room and eating him while he slept. Yeah… I hate snakes.

7. I Am Obsessed With …
Beer. I recently started to make my own beer, and now making, drinking, and learning about beer had become a full-fledged hobby. So I guess add that to #3.

8. The Book Currently On My Nightstand Is …
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. I went for a long time without reading the last three books in the series. I am now correcting that error.

9. Three Adjectives That Describe My Current Work Are …
Small-Scale. Connective. PushMe/PullYou.

10. In the Indie Art-House Bio Film Of My Life, I Should Be Played By …
Jim Broadbent. Forget the leading men; character actors are the ones with real depth, versatility and power.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

What are you working on right now, Matt?

I have been asking difficult questions about what it means to have children – and how the act of having children fits into the reality of an exploding world population.   And as we grow more populated and more technologically connected, how do we bond as humans and not as status updates?  These thoughts are starting to take shape as a new play, and I hope to have a first draft complete by September of 2013.

playwrightswest:

What are you working on right now, Matt?

I have been asking difficult questions about what it means to have children – and how the act of having children fits into the reality of an exploding world population. And as we grow more populated and more technologically connected, how do we bond as humans and not as status updates? These thoughts are starting to take shape as a new play, and I hope to have a first draft complete by September of 2013.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

Matthew: Do You Have A Ritual That You Follow When/Before You Write?

I do most of my writing in my head while in motion.  I will go on long walks – sometimes for hours so as to shape the play in my head.  The gym is also a great place to “write”.  By the time I begin typing at the computer, much of the work has been completed.   When I encounter challenges while drafting, I have to rise and pace around in order to solve the problem. 

Music plays a large role when I’m drafting.  I often find a piece of music with the  “tone” I hope the play evokes.  And then I will play that piece on a loop.  The piece must be instrumental, however…I don’t want any words invading my mind as I’m getting the play on the page.  In the past I’ve been inspired by the music of Phillip Glass, Hans Zimmer, Elliot Goldenthal, and Béla Bartók.

Once a draft is complete, I barely remember writing it.  There’s a huge disconnect that occurs, and I’ve yet to be able to explain it.  But it’s a gift – because as I edit the play, I have little personal connection to it as “the creator”.  It allows me to look at it pragmatically and problem solve – more as a director or producer.    And I love this part of the process – it’s where I get to truly apply all my skills as a theatre practitioner…the craft of it all.

playwrightswest:

Matthew: Do You Have A Ritual That You Follow When/Before You Write?

I do most of my writing in my head while in motion. I will go on long walks – sometimes for hours so as to shape the play in my head. The gym is also a great place to “write”. By the time I begin typing at the computer, much of the work has been completed. When I encounter challenges while drafting, I have to rise and pace around in order to solve the problem.

Music plays a large role when I’m drafting. I often find a piece of music with the “tone” I hope the play evokes. And then I will play that piece on a loop. The piece must be instrumental, however…I don’t want any words invading my mind as I’m getting the play on the page. In the past I’ve been inspired by the music of Phillip Glass, Hans Zimmer, Elliot Goldenthal, and Béla Bartók.

Once a draft is complete, I barely remember writing it. There’s a huge disconnect that occurs, and I’ve yet to be able to explain it. But it’s a gift – because as I edit the play, I have little personal connection to it as “the creator”. It allows me to look at it pragmatically and problem solve – more as a director or producer. And I love this part of the process – it’s where I get to truly apply all my skills as a theatre practitioner…the craft of it all.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

10 Questions With Matthew B. Zrebski

1. A Playwright I Have a Giant Artist Crush On Is …

Victor Lodato.
He is unapologetic about exploring the darker nature of human beings – and does so with sympathy and empathy.  In a single phrase, he has the ability to throw a dart at the audience’s conscience and make them contemplate what is most uncomfortable.  And that yields important questions – and can be transformative.

2.  A Play That Has Shaped My Artistic Voice Is …

Angels in America:  Millennium Approaches by Tony Kushner
I was a freshman in college when I read this play and then saw it on Broadway.  Later, I directed it.  It’s almost a cliché choice, because it’s become such an over referenced piece of contemporary literature.  But it’s no exaggeration to say there was theatre before this play – and after.  It combines politics, spirituality, high style, gritty naturalism, and magical realism and does so while keeping the audience on seat’s edge.  It taught me what is possible on a stage, and I will be forever grateful to Mr. Kushner.

3. When I’m Not Writing You Can Often Find Me …

On the couch, watching professional tennis.  I have a fantasy life, where I became a tennis star and won all four grand slams.  I have no real talent on the court, but I will continue to imagine what it’s like to lift the Wimbledon trophy.

4. My Artistic Voice Can Be Described as ______________ Meets ______________

A scab ripping meets a warm hug.

5. A Portland Artist or Company I’d Love To Work With Is … 

Tony Fuemmeler.
His mask work is truly stunning, and I’d love to write a piece of theatre with mask and puppet work in mind.  He also has an incredible sense of physical space and in general thinks outside the box.  I feel he is an artist who would force me to consider things in an entirely new way – and I’m always hungry for that.

6. I Am Terrified Of …

Being trapped in a crowd.  Oh, the irony.  Rarely am I able to sit in a crowded theatre and be calm.   I always sit on an aisle.  And there’s a word for this:  agoraphobia.  Yes, I have this condition; it reared its head in 1998.  It is a constant battle, and it’s made me well aware that God has a huge sense of humor.  If a play of mine is hugely successful, it will mean crowded theatres…and that might give me a panic attack. Yup.  Hilarious.

7. I Am Obsessed With … 

Time.  I love determining the most efficient way to do things.  I love systems that ensure efficiency.  I love the streamlining of communication to free up potential conflicts surrounding time and discussion.  And yes, this often drives the people around me crazy.

8. The Book Currently On My Nightstand Is … 

Full Dark, No Stars, by Stephen King.  I love his simple, character driven story telling.  And I often think his short work is best.  These novellas are certainly not disappointing.  

9. Three Adjectives That Describe My Current Work Are … 

Fury
Politically incorrect
Spiritual

10. In the Indie Art-House Bio Film Of My Life, I Should Be Played By … 

Peter Sarsgaard.
I see myself as irritatingly long winded, unable to control my urge to spout my opinions, but also extremely child like and goofy – and a bit dark.  But I could be totally wrong, because how does anyone know how he appears to others?  But I think this actor could handle all that…with ease.

playwrightswest:

10 Questions With Matthew B. Zrebski

1. A Playwright I Have a Giant Artist Crush On Is …

Victor Lodato.
He is unapologetic about exploring the darker nature of human beings – and does so with sympathy and empathy. In a single phrase, he has the ability to throw a dart at the audience’s conscience and make them contemplate what is most uncomfortable. And that yields important questions – and can be transformative.

2. A Play That Has Shaped My Artistic Voice Is …

Angels in America: Millennium Approaches by Tony Kushner
I was a freshman in college when I read this play and then saw it on Broadway. Later, I directed it. It’s almost a cliché choice, because it’s become such an over referenced piece of contemporary literature. But it’s no exaggeration to say there was theatre before this play – and after. It combines politics, spirituality, high style, gritty naturalism, and magical realism and does so while keeping the audience on seat’s edge. It taught me what is possible on a stage, and I will be forever grateful to Mr. Kushner.

3. When I’m Not Writing You Can Often Find Me …

On the couch, watching professional tennis. I have a fantasy life, where I became a tennis star and won all four grand slams. I have no real talent on the court, but I will continue to imagine what it’s like to lift the Wimbledon trophy.

4. My Artistic Voice Can Be Described as ______________ Meets ______________

A scab ripping meets a warm hug.

5. A Portland Artist or Company I’d Love To Work With Is …

Tony Fuemmeler.
His mask work is truly stunning, and I’d love to write a piece of theatre with mask and puppet work in mind. He also has an incredible sense of physical space and in general thinks outside the box. I feel he is an artist who would force me to consider things in an entirely new way – and I’m always hungry for that.

6. I Am Terrified Of …

Being trapped in a crowd. Oh, the irony. Rarely am I able to sit in a crowded theatre and be calm. I always sit on an aisle. And there’s a word for this: agoraphobia. Yes, I have this condition; it reared its head in 1998. It is a constant battle, and it’s made me well aware that God has a huge sense of humor. If a play of mine is hugely successful, it will mean crowded theatres…and that might give me a panic attack. Yup. Hilarious.

7. I Am Obsessed With …

Time. I love determining the most efficient way to do things. I love systems that ensure efficiency. I love the streamlining of communication to free up potential conflicts surrounding time and discussion. And yes, this often drives the people around me crazy.

8. The Book Currently On My Nightstand Is …

Full Dark, No Stars, by Stephen King. I love his simple, character driven story telling. And I often think his short work is best. These novellas are certainly not disappointing.

9. Three Adjectives That Describe My Current Work Are …

Fury
Politically incorrect
Spiritual

10. In the Indie Art-House Bio Film Of My Life, I Should Be Played By …

Peter Sarsgaard.
I see myself as irritatingly long winded, unable to control my urge to spout my opinions, but also extremely child like and goofy – and a bit dark. But I could be totally wrong, because how does anyone know how he appears to others? But I think this actor could handle all that…with ease.

Reblogged from playwrightswest
playwrightswest:

Where do you do your writing, Matt?

I do over half my writing at the quaint Rain City Coffee attached to the Hollywood Library in Northeast Portland.  As with the blank page, silence can be a terrifying thing when trying to get the words out.  The voices in my head get overwhelming.  Having the relaxing hum of the espresso brewing, the chattering of patrons, the cool music they always play - it helps me focus.  I also love supporting local businesses, and this is a good one.  They show genuine interest in their patrons and sell local artwork on the walls - even bringing in local musicians to play for children during certain hours.  It’s a home away from home for me - and where I have done the majority of my writing on Forky, To Cape, and Ablaze: an a cappella musical thriller…

playwrightswest:

Where do you do your writing, Matt?

I do over half my writing at the quaint Rain City Coffee attached to the Hollywood Library in Northeast Portland. As with the blank page, silence can be a terrifying thing when trying to get the words out. The voices in my head get overwhelming. Having the relaxing hum of the espresso brewing, the chattering of patrons, the cool music they always play - it helps me focus. I also love supporting local businesses, and this is a good one. They show genuine interest in their patrons and sell local artwork on the walls - even bringing in local musicians to play for children during certain hours. It’s a home away from home for me - and where I have done the majority of my writing on Forky, To Cape, and Ablaze: an a cappella musical thriller

Reblogged from playwrightswest
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